All posts by: technovision

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Is Personality Related to Risks Associated with Smartphones?

This is a preliminary study investigating the risks associated with smartphone addiction by personality and type of phone. The results relate to personal background, personality, smartphone usage, smartphone satisfaction, level of exposure to risks, and correlations between the variables. A significant but partial correlation was found between personality and smartphone addiction, satisfaction, and level of risk. Smartphone addiction was found to be positively correlated with extraversion (r = .21, p < .01). Satisfaction was found to be correlated positively with extraversion (r = .28, p < .01), agreeableness (r = .41,p < .01), and conscientiousness (r = .38, p < .01), and negatively with emotional stability (r = -.57, p < .01). Risk was found to be negatively correlated with agreeableness (r = -.17, p < .05). Differences between types of phone insatisfaction, risk, and smartphone addiction were examined. A significant correlation (F(4, 145) = 2.96, p < .05) was found in the level of smartphone addiction, but no differences were found in smartphone satisfaction or the level of risk associated withsmartphones (F(4, 145) = 2.96, p > .05 and F(4, 145)= .45, p > .05, respectively). According to the results, it seems that personality greatly affects phone usage and exposure to risks, regardless of the type of phone, and that reducing smartphone usage may be beneficial. However, further research using larger study samples is needed to confirm this.

Download: EUER20 10 09 YAVICH
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A Novel Approach to Integrated Science Teaching and Learning in a Selected Ghanaian Junior High School

The study was about a novel approach to Integrated Science teaching and learning in a selected Ghanaian junior high school. In this study, the approach to teaching and learning Integrated Science has been made entirely new and meaningful in the sense that the four learning behaviours (acquisition of knowledge, comprehension, application of knowledge and experimental skills) which constitute profile dimensions were incorporated into the objective-stating, lesson-delivery and assessment of lessons. The researcher made use of profile dimensions in preparing lesson plans, taught students with the new strategy and assessed the impact of the new approach on students in terms of teaching and learning of science. The students were highly interested in answering low order question. About 80% of the questions were high order questions which were poorly answered. They actually showed very little interest in answering high order questions. However, as the weeks went by and the approach to teaching the new strategy was improved, students’ interests were aroused and sustained leading to students demonstrating high ability to answer high order questions conveniently. By the end of the study, the students were able to set up and conduct experiments, observe the outcome and draw their own conclusions. The students could classify items based on their characteristics and discuss issues (like balanced diet) and outline the effect of malnutrition in animals. Students’ scientific drawings were neater and clearer with less woolen lines. The implication of the finding is that, with these learning behaviours and skills, students could do analytical thinking and have the capacity to apply their knowledge to problems and issues.

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The Effect of Pressure Groups and the Moral Intensity on School Administrators’ Unethical Behavior: An Evaluation According to Teachers’ Opinions

In this study, it was aimed to determine the effect of pressure groups and moral intensity on school administrators’ unethical behaviors according to teachers’ opinions. The study group of the research, which is causal comparative research, consists of 313 teachers. The research data have been collected by adapting the Openness to Violation of Ethical Decision (OVED) scale. In the research, descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA with repeated measures and two-way ANOVA for factorial design have been applied. In the research, it has been found out that the school administrators’ possibility of behaving unethically varies according to the moral intensity and pressure groups. As the moral intensity decreases, it can be stated that the school administrators’ possibility of behaving unethically increases when the demand comes from bureaucratic and political pressure groups. The school administrators’ possibility of performing an unethical act with both low and high moral intensity shows a meaningful difference according to the pressure group and the level of relationship between the teacher and the administrator. School administrators’ possibility of performing an unethical act with high moral intensity shows a meaningful difference according to teacher’s gender. At the end of the study,some suggestions have been made by considering the limitations and results of the research.

Download: EUERV3 3 8 ONDER
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Vol. 3 Iss. 3

Development of an Individual Professional Development Plan Proposal That is Based on Continuing Professional Development Needs of Teachers

The research was conducted to determine the needs of teachers for their continuous professional development and to create an individual professional development plan for this aim. For this purpose, descriptive survey model was used as amethod. There areboth qualitative and quantitative data in the research. The collection of research data was done in three stages. A survey was conducted in the first stage. At this stage, the population of the research consists of teachers from social networking networksfacebook, instangram and whatsApp, which are included in the teacher groups of 529.412 individuals. The sample is composed of507 teachers who voluntarily respond to the sharing in these groups. In the second phase of the study, focus group interviews were conducted with experts, teachers’ professional development needs were determined, and solutions were reported. In the third phase of the research method, relevant literature regarding the teachers’ professional development activities inthe world and howthese activities were carried out were collected through literature review. As a result of the research, the data gathered by the methods mentioned in the study were combined and an individual professional development plan proposal was prepared. The importance of individual professional development is emphasized for the professional development of teachers.

Download: EUER20 09 20 DURAN
Download: 67, size: 0, date: 13.Oct.2020
Vol. 3 Iss. 3

Personalizing learning with mobile technology in a secondary school in the Netherlands: Effects on students’ autonomy support, learning motivation and achievement

Abstract: Personalizing learning with technology in secondary schools is a way to empower students to take control of their learning. The more learners can direct their own learning experiences, including path, pace and instructional approach, the more they may learn what they want and need to learn. In a quasi-experimental design, data about the implementation and evaluation of three interventions in one secondary school in the Netherlands have been gathered with student questionnaires and regular exams. In these three interventions, each lasting one entire school year, teachers attempted to support their students’ autonomy in decisions during their learning process. Effects on students’ perceived autonomy support, learning motivation and their achievement have been examined. One intervention – the one with the highest scores on perceived autonomy support – shows small positive effects on students’ learning motivation and their achievement. Learner control over structural aspects of the curriculum, such as students’ autonomy to choose their tasks for practicing and reviewing and the way to complete them, is a possible effective way of designing personalizing learning in secondary education. In future research, more attention should be addressed to which combination of autonomy supportive activities might be effective. These effects might also be different for different student groups, based on, for example, their learning preferences and abilities.
Download: EUERV3 3 4 ADMIRAAL
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Online First, Vol. 3 Iss. 3

Earthquake and its Impacts on Education: Aftermath Nepal Quake 2015

Abstract: Although earthquakes themselves do not kill people, they highlight the critical importance of physical infrastructure resilience, safety measures and preparedness for natural disasters. Earthquakes are one of several environmental crises that can be categorized as a natural hazard/disaster. This study uses the qualitative method of research. The semi-structured interview with follow up questions among the educational actors like students, head/teachers, officials from the district education office and the local NGO staff working in the field of education before and immediately after the earthquake. The content analyses of curriculum of secondary level and textbooks of grade IX and X as well as field visit/observation were carried out during the study. The result and the conclusion of this study show that following the 2015 earthquake, the preparation of emergency bags helped children and their families gather essential items in a ready-to-go bag specifically designed for disaster situations. Simulation activities in schools helped prepare students for future disasters, and there were also many initiatives to reduce student and teacher trauma following the 2015 quake, including the development of a credited 5-hour teacher professional development (TPD) counselling programme. The inclusion of school disaster risk reduction (DRR) education in the curriculum and textbooks containing information on earthquakes, their cause, effects and preventive measures have now been disseminated in many languages including Nepali and
English.

Download: EUERV3 3 2 BASNED
Download: 71, size: 0, date: 15.Sep.2020
Vol. 3 Iss. 3

Strengthening of Religious Character Education Based on School Culture in the Indonesian Secondary School

Abstract:  This research aims to answer how the implementation of religious character education building based on school culture and conducted a successful program at SMAN 5 Yogyakarta (Yogyakarta 5 Public High School). This study is highly important to conduct since the religious character is an essential value in the learning process in Indonesia. The research subjects consisted of school principals, teachers, and students. Determination of the subjects carried out by purposive sampling. Data collection used interview, observation, and documentation. An interactively inductive data analysis technique performed data analysis with data reduction stages, data displays, and conclusion drawing. The results of the study showed that: 1) the implementation of religious character education building based on school culture was carried out through character building based on religious values, school climate based on religious values, extracurricular activities based on religious values, as well as building relationships between schools and the societies. 2) The impact of the strengthening program of character education produces two themes as follows: the growth of students’ religious awareness and the growth of tolerance among religious communities. The findings of this study indicated the importance of the school’s cultural base in implementing holistic religious character education programs in schools. This finding also strengthens the previous research findings, which had mentioned that the religious character is an essential character for students in a secondary school in Indonesia, and also strengthen that Indonesia’s society, in general, is religious people.

Download: EUERV3 3 1 HAYATI
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Vol. 3 Iss. 3

Types of Game-Based Learning in Education: A brief state of the art and the implementation in Greece

Abstract: The interest towards game-based learning (GBL) is continuously growing worldwide. However, several countries still face difficulties to efficiently implement GBL approaches in their Educational Institutions. This literature review is focused on the identification of the main types of GBL approaches that have been recently implemented in educational contexts, by providing one representative game-example for each case. The study also examines the implementation of GBL in educational contexts in Greece, identifying game-based learning popular tools and approaches.  A qualitative content analysis is used to investigate the general characteristics of the identified GBL types and the representative example-games, as well as the main benefits and drawbacks that render GBL implementation impracticable in several countries. Overall, this study contributes in the research attempt towards the recognition of the main GBL types, focusing on their drawbacks or other features that seem to­ affect their broad implementation in several countries and educational contexts.

Download: EUERV3 2 6 KATERINA
Download: 75, size: 0, date: 18.Jun.2020
Vol. 3 Iss. 2

The Strategy of Principal In Instilling Religious Character In Muhammadiyah Elementary School

Abstract: The most recent research showed that religious character is a character that was considered most important by the people of Indonesia in facing the challenges of modern life. Therefore, the religious character was needed to be instilled in the young generation through various channels, especially at formal educational institutions. This study aimed to describe the principal’s strategy in instilling religious character in students. This research was a type of qualitative research with a case study approach conducted at Al-Mujahidin Muhammadiyah Elementary School, a favourite elementary school in Wonosari Gunungkidul, Indonesia. Data were collected through interviews, observations, and documentation. The collected data were analyzed by inductively interactive data analysis techniques. The results showed that the principal used four strategies in instilling character to students, namely exemplary strategies, habit forming, integration in teaching in the classroom, and reinforcement in the form of reward and punishment. The findings of this study underlined the central role of the principal as a top leader in implementing religious character education in schools.

Download: EUERV3 2 3 SUYATNO
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Vol. 3 Iss. 2

Investment in Improvement Strategies and Academic Achievement: The Case of Secondary Schools in Kenya

Abstract: Secondary schools have adopted various strategies in an effort to improve performance. Collaboration and benchmarking are two such strategies. However, schools still continue to post poor grades in national examinations, an indicator that most of the students fail to meet the university cut off mark and thus fail to join university. This raises the question of whether such investment is really justified. This study sought to investigate whether investment in these two practices translated into improved education outcomes as measured by mean scores in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education. The study adopted correlation research design. From a target of 103 schools in the region involved in collaboration and benchmarking, 31schools were randomly selected. The sample comprised all 31 Directors of Studies and 31principals from the sampled schools. Data were collected using questionnaires with closed and open ended items, and document analysis. Data were analyzed inferentially (PPMCC and Multiple linear regression) using the Predictive Analytical Software (PASW) Version 19.0. The data on open ended items were coded using open coding, categorized and reported verbatim. Findings indicated that, investment in the two strategies significantly improved academic achievement (r=0.822; r2=0.676; adjusted r2=0.603). However, considered independently, investment in collaboration had a much higher impact on academic achievement (r=0.843, r2=0.711; adjusted r2=0.697), compared to investment in benchmarking (r=0.510, r2=0.260; adjusted r2=0.219). It is recommended that, schools should generously and uniformly invest in both collaboration and benchmarking in order to boost academic achievement.  In addition, well endowed schools should be encouraged to share their resources.

Download: EUERV3 2 4 AMUNGA
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Vol. 3 Iss. 2